Center on Faith & International Affairs

Center on Faith & International Affairs

IGE's research and publications arm, the Center on Faith & International Affairs (CFIA), equips scholars, practitioners, policymakers, religious leaders, and students with a balanced understanding of the role of religion in public life worldwide.

IGE believes firmly in universal human dignity and works to ensure that people of all faiths and none have full freedom of conscience and can participate as equal citizens in public life. CFIA advances IGE's mission by creating forums -- in print and in person -- for rigorous scholarship, practical policy debate, and constructive dialogue among people of different faiths, worldviews, and professional sectors. CFIA's programs include a quarterly journal, The Review of Faith & International Affairs, an affilated blogazine called "Faith & International Affairs Online," books, monographs, policy reports, op-eds, courses, conferences, and lectures.

The Review of Faith & International Affairs helps build bridges of understanding among scholars, practitioners, and policymakers in international affairs. It is the first and still only scholarly journal focused exclusively on how religion and religious freedom affect contemporary global issues. It fills an urgent need for intellectually rigorous yet accessible resources on these critical topics. The Review is published for CFIA by Routledge, an imprint of Taylor & Francis. Based in Oxford, UK, Routledge is one of the largest and most influential academic publishers in the world, particularly in the fields of International Relations and Strategic Studies.

In addition to its unique journal, CFIA influences the influential by sponsoring academic and policy oriented conferences/lectures, and by publishing groundbreaking books, monographs, policy reports, and op-eds. A particular topical strength for CFIA is the intersection of religion and security. For example, a 2003 IGE conference led to our book Religion and Security: The New Nexus in International Relations (Rowman & Littlefield, 2004), subsequently translated into Chinese and disseminated among government officials and scholars in China. More recently we published the first-ever Handbook of Religion and Security (Routledge, 2013). A related example of our impact in the religion-and-security field is that military institutions (especially the military chaplaincies) and other government agencies are increasingly requesting our lectures and publications as part of their own education programs.

CFIA achieves impact among students, practitioners, and religious congregations through publications and events that are relevant and accessible and that are motivated by IGE's values of holistic education and leadership development. One project for equipping Christian leaders is our 2004 book Ambassadors of Hope: How Christians Can Respond to the World's Toughest Problems, by IGE founder Robert A. Seiple (InterVarsity Press). An example of a  project tailored to practitioners is our 2009 book International Religious Freedom Advocacy: A  Guide to Organizations, Law, and NGOs, co-authored by H. Knox Thames, Chris Seiple, and Amy Rowe (Baylor University Press). An example of a CFIA book project designed specifically for students is the 2012 compendium, Religion and Foreign Affairs: Essential Readings, edited by Dennis Hoover and Douglas Johnston. This textbook is co-published by Baylor University Press and The Review of Faith & International Affairs.

Latest Issue

Under Caesar’s Sword: How Christians Respond to Persecution
Under Caesar’s Sword: How Christians Respond to Persecution Volume 15, No. 1 Spring 2017

The spring 2017 issue of The Review of Faith & International Affairs is a special theme issue titled, “Under Caesar’s Sword: How Christians Respond to Persecution.” Guest-edited by Daniel Philpott and Timothy Samuel Shah, this issue is the result of a collaboration with the Under Caesar’s Sword project at the University of Notre Dame. The project is the world’s first global investigation of Christian responses to persecution. Launched in fall 2014 by a grant of $1.1 million from the Templeton Religion Trust, the project is carried out by a team of 15 scholars who have studied Christian responses in 25 countries. 

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